Share this article on social media!

You may be interested in senior strength and balance exercises because you’re looking to stay active and independent as you age. Strength training can help improve balance and coordination, which can help keep you safe as you navigate around your community. Strength training can also help reduce the risk of falls and fractures while improving overall muscle tone and strength.

How to get started with senior strength and balance exercises training

If you’re new to senior strength exercises, working with a certified personal trainer can help you get started. A personal trainer can develop a workout routine that’s tailored to your individual fitness goals and abilities.

If you’re comfortable working out on your own, there are plenty of resources available to help you get started, including online workouts, YouTube videos, and books.

When starting a strength training program, it’s important to focus on exercises that target the major muscle groups in your body, including the chest, back, shoulders, arms, legs, and hips. These are the muscles that will help you stay strong and independent as you age.

It’s also important to use a weight that’s challenging but not too heavy. You should be able to complete 10 to 15 repetitions of each exercise with good form. If you can’t complete 10 repetitions, the weight is too heavy. If you can complete more than 15 repetitions, the weight is too light.

The best exercises for seniors

Once you’ve selected a weight, there are a few simple senior strength exercises you can do to target all of the major muscle groups in your body.

1. Chest press

Target muscles: chest, shoulders, and arms
Instructions: Sit on a bench or stability ball with your feet flat on the floor and a weight in each hand. Start with your arms extended straight out in front of you at shoulder level. From here, bend your elbows and lower the weights down to your chest. Pause for a count of two, then press the weights back up to the starting position.

2. Seated row

Target muscles: back and arms
Instructions: Sit on a bench or stability ball with your feet flat on the floor and a weight in each hand. Start with your arms extended straight out in front of you at shoulder level. From here, bend your elbows and pull the weights back toward your chest, squeezing your shoulder blades together as you do. Pause for a count of two, then return to the starting position.

3. Biceps curl

Target muscles: arms and shoulders
Instructions: Sit on a bench or stability ball with your feet flat on the floor and a weight in each hand. Start with your arms extended straight out in front of you at shoulder level. From here, bend your elbows and curl the weights up toward your chest. Pause for a count of two, then lower the weights back down to the starting position.

4. Triceps extension

Target muscles: arms and shoulders
Instructions: Sit on a bench or stability ball with your feet flat on the floor and a weight in each hand. Start with your arms bent and the weights held behind your head. From here, extend your arms straight overhead. Pause for a count of two, then return to the starting position.

5. Leg press

Target muscles: legs and hips
Instructions: Sit on a leg press machine with your feet flat on the footplate, and your knees bent at 90 degrees. Start with the weight lifted off of the stack. From here, press down on the footplate until your legs are straight. Pause for a count of two, then return to the starting position.

6. Squat

Target muscles: legs and hips
Instructions: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and a weight held at arm’s length in front of you. Start with your feet shoulder-width apart and a weight held at arm’s length in front of you. From here, lower your body down into a squat, keeping your knees behind your toes. Pause for a count of two, then return to the starting position.

7. Calf raise

Target muscles: calves
Instructions: Place your feet hip-width apart and hold onto a weight at arm’s length in front of you. Start with your feet hip-width apart and hold onto a weight at arm’s length in front of you. From here, raise up onto your toes, then slowly lower back down. Pause for a count of two, then return to the starting position.

Tips for staying safe while doing senior strength exercises

Start slow

When starting a strength training program, it’s important to take things slowly at first. Give your body time to adjust to the new demands you’re placing on it, and don’t try to do too much too soon.

Listen to your body

It’s also important to listen to your body and stop if you feel any pain. If you’re not sure how to do an exercise correctly, ask a certified personal trainer or your doctor for help.

Stay hydrated

Drinking plenty of water is important for overall health, but it’s especially important when you’re strength training. Be sure to drink plenty of water before, during, and after your workout.

Warm-up and cool down

Warming up and cooling down are important for all types of exercise, but they’re especially important when you’re strength training. Be sure to warm up with some light cardio and stretch before you start lifting weights. After your workout, cool down with some more light cardio and static stretches.

If you have any chronic health conditions, talk to your doctor before starting a strength training program. They can help you determine if there are any modifications you need to make or exercises you should avoid.

The importance of rest and recovery

Rest and recovery are an important part of any exercise program, but they’re especially important when you’re strength training. Be sure to give your body time to rest between workouts, and don’t try to do too much too soon.

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to how long you should rest between workouts, as the amount of rest and recovery you need will vary depending on your individual body and fitness level.

However, it’s generally recommended to rest at least one day between strength workouts.
If you want an answer tailored to your specific needs, you can talk with your doctor or a personal trainer. They can help you develop a plan that includes the appropriate amount of rest and recovery for you.

Conclusion

Strength training is an important part of a healthy exercise routine for seniors. It can help improve your balance, strength, and overall fitness level. However, it’s important to start slowly and listen to your body to avoid injury. Be sure to warm up, cool down, and drink plenty of water before, during, and after your workout.

With a little time and effort, strength training can be a great way to stay active and improve your overall health as you age. These seven exercises are a great place to start, but be sure to talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise program.

 

About the author : Veronica Quiñones

headshot of Veronica Quiñones

Owner and Senior Advisor

Article by:

Veronica Quiñones

Owner and Senior Advisor

headshot of Veronica Quiñones

Recent Posts

Topics

By Published On: June 21, 2022Categories: Elder Care, Elder Care Resources

Share this article on social media!

You may be interested in senior strength and balance exercises because you’re looking to stay active and independent as you age. Strength training can help improve balance and coordination, which can help keep you safe as you navigate around your community. Strength training can also help reduce the risk of falls and fractures while improving overall muscle tone and strength.

How to get started with senior strength and balance exercises training

If you’re new to senior strength exercises, working with a certified personal trainer can help you get started. A personal trainer can develop a workout routine that’s tailored to your individual fitness goals and abilities.

If you’re comfortable working out on your own, there are plenty of resources available to help you get started, including online workouts, YouTube videos, and books.

When starting a strength training program, it’s important to focus on exercises that target the major muscle groups in your body, including the chest, back, shoulders, arms, legs, and hips. These are the muscles that will help you stay strong and independent as you age.

It’s also important to use a weight that’s challenging but not too heavy. You should be able to complete 10 to 15 repetitions of each exercise with good form. If you can’t complete 10 repetitions, the weight is too heavy. If you can complete more than 15 repetitions, the weight is too light.

The best exercises for seniors

Once you’ve selected a weight, there are a few simple senior strength exercises you can do to target all of the major muscle groups in your body.

1. Chest press

Target muscles: chest, shoulders, and arms
Instructions: Sit on a bench or stability ball with your feet flat on the floor and a weight in each hand. Start with your arms extended straight out in front of you at shoulder level. From here, bend your elbows and lower the weights down to your chest. Pause for a count of two, then press the weights back up to the starting position.

2. Seated row

Target muscles: back and arms
Instructions: Sit on a bench or stability ball with your feet flat on the floor and a weight in each hand. Start with your arms extended straight out in front of you at shoulder level. From here, bend your elbows and pull the weights back toward your chest, squeezing your shoulder blades together as you do. Pause for a count of two, then return to the starting position.

3. Biceps curl

Target muscles: arms and shoulders
Instructions: Sit on a bench or stability ball with your feet flat on the floor and a weight in each hand. Start with your arms extended straight out in front of you at shoulder level. From here, bend your elbows and curl the weights up toward your chest. Pause for a count of two, then lower the weights back down to the starting position.

4. Triceps extension

Target muscles: arms and shoulders
Instructions: Sit on a bench or stability ball with your feet flat on the floor and a weight in each hand. Start with your arms bent and the weights held behind your head. From here, extend your arms straight overhead. Pause for a count of two, then return to the starting position.

5. Leg press

Target muscles: legs and hips
Instructions: Sit on a leg press machine with your feet flat on the footplate, and your knees bent at 90 degrees. Start with the weight lifted off of the stack. From here, press down on the footplate until your legs are straight. Pause for a count of two, then return to the starting position.

6. Squat

Target muscles: legs and hips
Instructions: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and a weight held at arm’s length in front of you. Start with your feet shoulder-width apart and a weight held at arm’s length in front of you. From here, lower your body down into a squat, keeping your knees behind your toes. Pause for a count of two, then return to the starting position.

7. Calf raise

Target muscles: calves
Instructions: Place your feet hip-width apart and hold onto a weight at arm’s length in front of you. Start with your feet hip-width apart and hold onto a weight at arm’s length in front of you. From here, raise up onto your toes, then slowly lower back down. Pause for a count of two, then return to the starting position.

Tips for staying safe while doing senior strength exercises

Start slow

When starting a strength training program, it’s important to take things slowly at first. Give your body time to adjust to the new demands you’re placing on it, and don’t try to do too much too soon.

Listen to your body

It’s also important to listen to your body and stop if you feel any pain. If you’re not sure how to do an exercise correctly, ask a certified personal trainer or your doctor for help.

Stay hydrated

Drinking plenty of water is important for overall health, but it’s especially important when you’re strength training. Be sure to drink plenty of water before, during, and after your workout.

Warm-up and cool down

Warming up and cooling down are important for all types of exercise, but they’re especially important when you’re strength training. Be sure to warm up with some light cardio and stretch before you start lifting weights. After your workout, cool down with some more light cardio and static stretches.

If you have any chronic health conditions, talk to your doctor before starting a strength training program. They can help you determine if there are any modifications you need to make or exercises you should avoid.

The importance of rest and recovery

Rest and recovery are an important part of any exercise program, but they’re especially important when you’re strength training. Be sure to give your body time to rest between workouts, and don’t try to do too much too soon.

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to how long you should rest between workouts, as the amount of rest and recovery you need will vary depending on your individual body and fitness level.

However, it’s generally recommended to rest at least one day between strength workouts.
If you want an answer tailored to your specific needs, you can talk with your doctor or a personal trainer. They can help you develop a plan that includes the appropriate amount of rest and recovery for you.

Conclusion

Strength training is an important part of a healthy exercise routine for seniors. It can help improve your balance, strength, and overall fitness level. However, it’s important to start slowly and listen to your body to avoid injury. Be sure to warm up, cool down, and drink plenty of water before, during, and after your workout.

With a little time and effort, strength training can be a great way to stay active and improve your overall health as you age. These seven exercises are a great place to start, but be sure to talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise program.

 

Article by:

Veronica Quiñones

Owner and Senior Advisor

headshot of Veronica Quiñones

Recent Posts

Topics