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Music can bring back memories! The Alive Inside documentary demonstrates to the world that music can combat memory loss or at least bring back old memories for those living with Alzheimer’s or Dementia. If you have not already watched this Sundance film documentary, we highly recommend it.  North Star Senior Advisors partners with several Assisted Living and Memory Care communities in Central Florida who specialize in Music and Memory programs.

“One good thing about music, when it hits you, you feel no pain”. -Bob Marley

Music has always been a gateway for everyone to express their feelings, however, how can it become a great way to break through Dementia and Alzheimer’s patients?

In recent studies, it has shown that music has the tendency to bring back memories in patients who have Dementia and Alzheimers. According to alzheimers.net, there are 5 reasons why researchers believe that music boosts brain activity:

1.       Music is known to evoke emotions that bring memories. (For example, every time I listen to “Burn” by Usher, my minds automatically wanders back to when I was a little girl in the back seat of my dad’s car, holding my CD player in my hand and feeling the wind in my hair as I scream “let it burrrrnnnnn!”) When you are able to pair music with everyday activities, patients typically are able to form a rhythm that will allow them to recall memory. It will eventually improve the cognitive ability of dementia and Alzheimer’s patients.

2.       “Musical aptitude and appreciations are two of the last remaining abilities in dementia patients.” – Linda Maguire. Since these are two abilities that stay for a long time after other abilities have passed, it’s one of the best ways to reach a patient.

3.       Music can bring emotional and physical closeness. When a patient is in the later stages of dementia and Alzheimers, they tend to lose any emotion towards their loved ones. Most of the time when you hear a song you automatically want to start dancing, which eventually leads to hugging and kissing your loved ones. This also has the tendency to bring security and memories to the patient.

4.       Singing is engaging. I know every time I hear a song that I know, I start singing like its nobody’s business. In the recent study conducted, it showed that dementia and Alzheimer patients were exercising more brain power than usual, due to them singing, listening and watching the music class.

5.       Music can shift mood, manage stress and stimulate positive interactions. I personally know that when I’m sad or angry, a way to calm me down is blasting my favorite music. It tends to soothe my stress and pain and makes me think more logically and not irrationally. According to the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America “ When used appropriately, music can shift mood, manage stress-induced agitation, stimulate positive interactions, facilitate cognitive function and coordinate motor movements.” This happens because when you listen to music you usually use little to no mental processing. Since singing does not require a cognitive function, which is usually non-existent in dementia patients, music can become vital to a patients health.

Furthermore, the next time you are with your loved one who has dementia or Alzheimers, try to put one of their favorite songs and see what type of effect it brings them. You will probably be surprised and be able to share one of your most memorable memories.

It’s very important to recognize music that your loved one will enjoy. Familiar songs bring back memories. When working with assisted living facilities, we notice while on tours that they’ll play soothing tunes from the 30’s through 60’s. You’ll also see ballroom dancers perform, musical entertainers, and music and memory programs created specifically for each resident. Whether your loved one enjoys participating in activities or not, who doesn’t want to hear a good song or two?

If you’d like to learn more about communities who offer music stimulation programs, give us a call.

-Mari Diaz, Marketing & Administrative Assistant

About the author : Veronica Quiñones

headshot of Veronica Quiñones

Owner and Senior Advisor

Article by:

Veronica Quiñones

Owner and Senior Advisor

headshot of Veronica Quiñones

Recent Posts

Topics

By Published On: August 26, 2018Categories: Elder Care, Elder Care Resources, Tips for our Seniors

Share this article on social media!

Music can bring back memories! The Alive Inside documentary demonstrates to the world that music can combat memory loss or at least bring back old memories for those living with Alzheimer’s or Dementia. If you have not already watched this Sundance film documentary, we highly recommend it.  North Star Senior Advisors partners with several Assisted Living and Memory Care communities in Central Florida who specialize in Music and Memory programs.

“One good thing about music, when it hits you, you feel no pain”. -Bob Marley

Music has always been a gateway for everyone to express their feelings, however, how can it become a great way to break through Dementia and Alzheimer’s patients?

In recent studies, it has shown that music has the tendency to bring back memories in patients who have Dementia and Alzheimers. According to alzheimers.net, there are 5 reasons why researchers believe that music boosts brain activity:

1.       Music is known to evoke emotions that bring memories. (For example, every time I listen to “Burn” by Usher, my minds automatically wanders back to when I was a little girl in the back seat of my dad’s car, holding my CD player in my hand and feeling the wind in my hair as I scream “let it burrrrnnnnn!”) When you are able to pair music with everyday activities, patients typically are able to form a rhythm that will allow them to recall memory. It will eventually improve the cognitive ability of dementia and Alzheimer’s patients.

2.       “Musical aptitude and appreciations are two of the last remaining abilities in dementia patients.” – Linda Maguire. Since these are two abilities that stay for a long time after other abilities have passed, it’s one of the best ways to reach a patient.

3.       Music can bring emotional and physical closeness. When a patient is in the later stages of dementia and Alzheimers, they tend to lose any emotion towards their loved ones. Most of the time when you hear a song you automatically want to start dancing, which eventually leads to hugging and kissing your loved ones. This also has the tendency to bring security and memories to the patient.

4.       Singing is engaging. I know every time I hear a song that I know, I start singing like its nobody’s business. In the recent study conducted, it showed that dementia and Alzheimer patients were exercising more brain power than usual, due to them singing, listening and watching the music class.

5.       Music can shift mood, manage stress and stimulate positive interactions. I personally know that when I’m sad or angry, a way to calm me down is blasting my favorite music. It tends to soothe my stress and pain and makes me think more logically and not irrationally. According to the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America “ When used appropriately, music can shift mood, manage stress-induced agitation, stimulate positive interactions, facilitate cognitive function and coordinate motor movements.” This happens because when you listen to music you usually use little to no mental processing. Since singing does not require a cognitive function, which is usually non-existent in dementia patients, music can become vital to a patients health.

Furthermore, the next time you are with your loved one who has dementia or Alzheimers, try to put one of their favorite songs and see what type of effect it brings them. You will probably be surprised and be able to share one of your most memorable memories.

It’s very important to recognize music that your loved one will enjoy. Familiar songs bring back memories. When working with assisted living facilities, we notice while on tours that they’ll play soothing tunes from the 30’s through 60’s. You’ll also see ballroom dancers perform, musical entertainers, and music and memory programs created specifically for each resident. Whether your loved one enjoys participating in activities or not, who doesn’t want to hear a good song or two?

If you’d like to learn more about communities who offer music stimulation programs, give us a call.

-Mari Diaz, Marketing & Administrative Assistant

Article by:

Veronica Quiñones

Owner and Senior Advisor

headshot of Veronica Quiñones

Recent Posts

Topics